Our Work

Four very hungry nestling Cooper's hawks were rescued this week. Three of them had been without food for so long they were having trouble digesting food. This is called refeeding syndrome and tube feeding with a special diet is needed to get the GI tract working again. These nestlings are improving and almost all are able to digest meat today. ...

View on Facebook

Young barn owls attempting to scare us off. They are sometimes called ghost owls because of their white faces and spooky behaviors. ...

View on Facebook

It's egg laying time for box turtles. We've had two injured females come in this week that are ready to lay their eggs. Female box turtles search for a suitable location with soft damp soil or mulch to lay their eggs. The incubation time and sex of the hatchlings will depend on the temperature of the nest during incubation. Temperatures of 75 to 80 degrees F produce more males and will take 70-80 days to hatch. Temperatures of 85-90 degrees F will produce more females and hatch in 55-60 days. Females that need to stay in the hospital will be induced to lay their eggs here and we will incubate them. ...

View on Facebook

Belted kingfisher receiving treatment for a fractured wing. This is a female, which in this avian species is more brightly colored than the males. Kingfishers are fun to watch, scanning the water for fish, diving in and grabbing the fish in their beak, then flying back to a branch and slapping it on the branch to kill it before swallowing it whole. ...

View on Facebook

Wildlife Vet Care shared Wildlife Rescue, Inc. of New Mexico's photo. ...

It's time for our yearly WARNING: if you see this scenario, it is NOT a case of making friends!!! Praying Mantises kill and EAT hummingbirds. Unlikely as it may seem, they wait patiently until their moment comes, then strike with those razor sharp front legs, spearing the bird. So, if you come across a Mantis on a feeder, move it to some other realm (no need to kill it, they are useful insects). If you just can't believe it, do some research and you will be convinced. Image by "Rural Ramblings"

View on Facebook

This young chipmunk has bite wounds and a back injury caused by an outdoor cat. Young wild animals are at an increased risk of being killed or wounded by cats because they are not full grown and not as quick or skilled as adults. If you have cats, please keep them inside as much as possible, especially during this time of year when baby wild animals are leaving their nests and make easy prey for cats. ...

View on Facebook

This non-native turtle patient was rescued after being hit by a car. These red-eared sliders are sold in pet stores when they are small, and many have been released into wild after they grew to this size and their owners don't want them anymore. It is illegal to release pet turtles in VA because they can transmit new diseases into the wild, or become invasive the way the red-eared sliders are out competing our native painted turtles. This turtle cannot be released again so we found her a new loving home. ...

View on Facebook

A baby skunk getting a check up after his mother and a sibling were hit and killed on the road last night. Fortunately this one is not injured. The Good Samaritan who picked him up deserves a gold star for stopping to help and rescuing him because he does smell strongly of skunk. ...

View on Facebook

Care for sick and injured wildlife 540-664-9494