Our Work

We are so glad to see this bat! This is a little brown bat - once the most common bat in VA, their populations have recently decreased by 97% due to White Nose Syndrome, a new fungus that kills hibernating bats. The large colonies of these bats that we used to have in VA could eat huge numbers of insects, each bat consuming its weight in insects on a summer night (though they are very small, each bat weighing only as much as a quarter). This bat was found on a building in Ashburn - she had been in a visible location on the outside of the building for 2 days which is unusual because these bats are secretive and hide during the day. She is thin and may be a juvenile who became separated from her colony.
For more information see:
www.google.com/amp/observer.com/2017/03/white-nose-syndrome-bat-populations-north-america/amp/
And
The Save Lucy Campaign
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Not every rehabilitated wild animal release is a good opportunity to see wildlife up close. This rehabilitated Cooper's hawk was in a big hurry to get back in the woods and hide. ...

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The night vision camera in the barred owl cage lets us see what they are doing at night. Two of these owls are ready to be released and will be set free tomorrow night at Chet Hobert Park. Hope to see you there! #wildlifevetcare ...

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We will be releasing two rehabilitated barred owls into the woods at the Park at 7 pm. Join us to see these beautiful owls flying away and returning to life in the wild. Meet at the parking lot next to the playground at the park. ...

Release of Rescued Barred Owls

August 15, 2017, 7:00pm

We will be releasing two rehabilitated barred owls into the woods at the Park at 7 pm. Join us to see these beautiful owls flying away and returning to life in the wild. Meet at the parking lot next to the playground at the park.

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This young box turtle was found 2 months ago in a park with duct tape wrapped around her broken shell and maggots in her wounds. Someone had tried to help her broken shell then released her, but should have called a wildlife rehabilitator instead. This turtle needed veterinary treatment and thankfully was found before the maggot infestation killed her. Thank you rehabilitators Dinah and Jane for saving her life and getting her the help she needed! She was released today. ...

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Getting radiographs on a young osprey this morning. We wish our patients knew we are trying to help them. ...

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An injured gray fox rescued off the road in downtown Winchester is receiving treatment. Gray foxes are smaller and more shy than red foxes and are not usually found living in close proximity to people. They are more of a woodland fox, can climb trees, and like to feed on voles, shrews and cottontails. This young male is expected to recover and be released again. ...

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The injured killdeer rescued 4 weeks ago is enjoying his freedom. ...

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An injured red-tailed hawk was rescued off Route 7 yesterday. After receiving three calls about an injured hawk on the median of Route 7, we went to check out the situation. Sometimes a hawk feeding on prey and "mantling" can look like it has a broken wing, But this hawk did have an injured wing and needed to be carefully rescued, making sure it did not run out into traffic. ...

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It's so difficult to wake up on Monday mornings - especially if you're an owl. These screech owls normally sleep all day and hunt mice all night. In this cage we've placed an orphan owlet with Hootie, our adult screech owl permanent resident who is teaching this orphan how to behave as a screech owl should ...

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Care for sick and injured wildlife 540-664-9494